How Do I Know If I Have a Zantac Cancer Claim?

You have already done quite a bit of internet research and likely found that getting to the answer can be a little more complicated than it sounds. “Zantac” is just the brand name of a popular heartburn drug called ranitidine (kind of like Xerox is just the popular brand name of a copy machine). So we will just use the name Zantac to loosely refer to all ranitidine products. Zantac can be prescribed by a doctor or purchased over-the-counter, for different digestive issues. Zantac is produced by a bunch of drug companies you know (Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline, Sanofi, Boehringer, etc.) and a bunch of generic drug manufacturers that you have probably never heard of. You have also likely been told by now that generic drug companies are generally immune to lawsuits (yes and no – but you likely will have to prove that you were not taking generic Zantac only). In addition, you may have been taking combinations of different types of Zantac over several years, and you obviously did not save all of your Zantac receipts. All of this starts to seem complicated, but you have to break it down into more manageable parts.


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What is Zantac (ranitidine)?

You have seen a lot of commercials and have probably been searching the internet for some straightforward explanations about Zantac Cancer Lawsuits and Settlements.

Very simply, Zantac is the brand name of a common heartburn medication called ranitidine. Zantac (ranitidine) is a type of drug known as an H2 blocker, or H2 antagonist, which decreases stomach acid by blocking histamine receptors in the stomach. It can be used to treat peptic ulcers, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and related conditions.


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The potential issues with Zantac just became a little more complicated. Zantac is the brand name of a common heartburn medication called ranitidine. As we have reported, there have been multiple, and ongoing, recalls of ranitidine after testing of lots of the drug showed unacceptable levels of the probable human carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA).

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We have already written at length about the nationwide litigation alleging contamination of Valsartan, Losartan, and Irbesartan, with carcinogenic substances. Basically, the claims are that generic versions of those drugs were being made overseas using poor manufacturing processes that caused the drugs to be tainted with impurities.

That contamination included the probable human carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), prompting mass recalls by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA). Those pending lawsuits point out that NDMA is the substance actually used in research facilities to induce cancer in lab rats. Accordingly, individual claims in those cases allege serious injuries such as liver damage and various cancers (including liver, kidney, colorectal, and gastric cancers).


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